African American and African Children Should Be Blogging

African American and African Children Should Be Blogging

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African American and African Children Should Be Blogging
by William Jackson @wmjackson
Educator, Blogger, Community Activist,

The inclusion of technology especially the explosion
of wireless technologies provide African American and
African children a great opportunity to share their voices.
No time in human history has the human voice been able
to reach so many people instantly and so powerfully.

Digital technologies have embedded themselves in the
lifestyles of children, the communication gaps have
been forever destroyed. The only challenge is to open the
eyes of African American and African children to connect
with each other.

Blogging either the traditional way of writing or even the
growing Podcasting, Vblogging and other streaming
services opens unimaginable ways to collaborate and
network. The use of Microblogging can be seen in
Africa because the scenes that the world does not see
can now be enjoyed.

“On Twitter, the ebb and flow of conversations such as
#TheAfricaTheyNeverShowYou and the role of global
media in its perception of the continent remains a great

talking point.” CNN Africa Social Media Consumption
African Americans have moved into a digital age that is
embracing ideas of diversity and multicultural shades
of acceptance and unity. Children are not quick to see
shades of color as adults do; parental influences directly
affect the growth and development of children in their
mental, emotional and spiritual growth, if directed in
the right ways they can be beneficial and productive.

In a world of diversity parents cannot afford to teach
their children racism, bias, bigotry and prejudice
because they cannot predict what environment their
children will be working in or what relationships that
will develop either personal or professional.

Technology breaks down the limitations of connecting,
but parents build mental barriers that destroy trust and
relationship building.
The inclusiveness of technology is taking many of those
of color and culture into the 21st century where they
can connect to the world. There is an estimated 8
million bloggers in America (The State of Blogging
2005), Pew Internet & American Life Project). Africa
has an estimated around 9% of Africans use social
media.

Technology is infused in all aspects of life and is expanding
daily and becoming more intuitive to the wants and needs of
the user. This is requiring African Americans and African
people to accept and embrace the education required to
grow. There is so much technology available in schools
children need to understand how to apply these new tools
to life not to just play games or cyberbully.

If knowledge is lacking then children of African American
and African diaspora will be at a disadvantage. They will
be struggling to acquire the knowledge to be knowledge
workers in a digital world of information.

The proficiency of reading (literacy/comprehension) and
writing (creative thought process) is needed now more
than ever. Manual labor jobs are still there, even they
are using technology that requires thinking. Statistically
African Americans are behind in technology applications
and implementation (digital divide) professionally and
educationally. Social media will not produce jobs, it will
not empower people monetarily. Degrees and
certifications are the way to go that will empower
children for careers and financial stability.

Teaching our children blogging is a new world, a world
of digitized created expressions and voices on a multitude
of subjects that matter.
The skill of blogging does opens doors to avenues of
business ventures to expand literary and informational
access. Their voices are provided a platform to share their
happiness, trials, tribulations. Each generation has moved
from the spiritual songs, hymns and other harmonic
expressions that past generations have used. Today in
this digital age the quiet sounds are of processors of digital
devices that move codes, create binary languages that
produce what is held in the hearts and minds of children,
youth, teens and young adults.
Blogging produces content for cyber-publishing, to share
stories, ideas, passions, and in some cases rants and raves.
The capability for African Americans and Africans to launch
their own newspaper, magazine, radio and even television
shows is empowering. What better way to involve generations
to become contributors to the discussions that need to be
presented to the people.

Africans and African Americans must embrace technology
and all that it has to offer to build communities up to
educate each generation to be better than the next.
Technology is about communication between people and
helping them to be empowered.

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William graduated from #SouthCarolinaStateUniversity earning a Bachelor’s in #Education, he furthered his education, earning a Masters of Arts in Teaching from Webster University with a focus on Educational Technology, #SocialMedia and #STEM. William’s career involves teaching with #NASA throughout the 90’s, technology consultant with the Florida Department of Education early 2000’s and currently Professor with #EdwardWatersCollege (2004 to present) teaching Educational Technology, Social Media and STEM. Over 25 yrs in public education teaching Physical Education and #Technology, on the elementary level. William is a 4th generation educator. An instructor in the Call Me Mister Program at Edward Waters College. William is not only an educator, but he is a Social Media consultant, presenter on STEM/#STEAM, Bullying and Cyberbullying, Internet Safety and his passion #Blogging and #Writing. William keeps active in the Jacksonville community involved in Mentoring Programs for youth, teens and young adults. Mentoring and guiding teens and young adults. The focus of the writings: Technology in Education, The engagement of STEM and STEAM, Bullying, Internet Safety, Social Media, Suicide Prevention, empowering fathers and parenting issues are just a few of his blogs.